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CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 1:00pm EDT
different choices in education. you see one young man majoring in math and science. one young women majoring in, actually gender studies, literature, fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. when they enter the workplace, you see more women going into nonprofits and working shorter hours and you see more men in investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason that these two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. now, a man and then the woman who start off at goldman sachs, they start out the same, they should be paid the same, but if they are not, there are avenues to dispute. that is the difference. >> host: what you think about the white house council on women and girls? >> guest: i think they need to have a council on men and boys. you can see the young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, the single men have lower earnings. you can see that their are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than gir
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 6:45am EDT
do field science. to know what rocks and soils are nearby and what they can reach or how long it might take somewhere, the use a combination of 3-d images, computer graphics, and simulations often overlaying them. these visualizations allow them to point to places, give them names, and control precisely where new photographs are taken and where the instruments are placed. so for example, they can draw a yellow box to specify where a camera should zoom in for a more detailed image. each photograph can be used like a map of an area on mars, because its location relative to the rover is precisely registered in the planning program. as we move him from panoramas used for navigating it manages about crops to the micro photographs, we can see and market up details. even small rocks and patches of soil might be named and become targets for analysis or a micro photographs. combining these planning tools in their imagination, the scientists can work as if they were on mars. jim rice, a geologist on a mission, said i put myself out there, with two boots on the ground trying to figure out w
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 1:00am EDT
make different choices in education. you see young minute majoring in matt and science. and more young women in gender study and literature. field that are not going pay as well. when they enter the workplace you see more women going in to non-profit and shorter hours and more men in and investment banks and computer science. there isn't any reason the two groups should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man and woman in the investment bank, they got out of cold man sacks. those should be paid the same. they are paid the same. if there are not there avenues to sue. that's the big difference. >> what dow you think about the white house counsel on women and girls? >> i think the white house needs to have a counsel on men and boys. because you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and women than the single men have lower earnings. you see they are far higher rates of boys cropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than girls. and so if the white house wants to have a counsel on women and girl
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 8:00pm EDT
in math and science and more young women majoring in actually gender studies, literature. fields that are not going to pay as well as math and science. then when they enter the workplace, you see more women going into nonprofit. you see more women working shorter hours and you see more than an investment banks in computer science. there isn't any reason that these two group should be paid the same if they make different choices. a man at a woman in an investment bank though that goldman sachs should be paid the same. they are paid the same and if they are not there are avenues to sue. but that is the big difference. >> what do you think about the white house counsel on women and girls? >> well i think the white house leak has a counsel on men and boys because you can see that young men have lower earnings than young women. if you look at single men and single women in urban areas, then the single men have lower earnings. you can see that there are far higher rates of voice dropping out of high school than girls. boys are getting less education now than girls and so the white house wan
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 11:30pm EDT
science to determine the outcome of elections. >> host: well, sasha this is a provocative and timely look as we are weeks away from the election. i want to know how did you come to want to write this book? >> guest: i covered campaigns beginning in philadelphia, so i was paying more attention to sort of tactics and techniques in the physical world of campaigns just because in the big city so much attention was being paid to the vote counted and precinct targeted so i talked to people that were making tv ads and i was always shocked as i think anybody that spent time on the campaigns is that most people couldn't explain to me why they did anything that they were doing. how do you know that and why do you do that and at some point they did it because the it always done it that we were they had some sort of a rule that wasn't based on any research. so some sort of skepticism about a lot of practices that were taking place and the way people were spending money and devoting time and resources and as i learned about people starving in academia doing these randomized control trials rather than
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 7:00pm EDT
science teachers largess. somebody suggested confiscating all the furniture from the site and swing. learning happens in many different ways. the something this silly could get out of hand the pressure everybody was under. science teachers especially. anabel garza looked at the ceiling. she knew mr. kaiser was yon had time and energy to use but -- bair and tables she had the maker once. tell her to lasso the but. i told them not to move furniture. ordinary drama made for a pleasant distraction after the meeting she made her rounds coming across the teacher worried about turning down the fish tank due to drought conditions. there is a living thing in their. [laughter] so the next passage something that should never have to happen. a few months later anabel has rounded up some of her best students to go to the middle school. it was like scores are coming up and they need to show the middle school students they have a reason to come to reagan high. this will also include at the start athlete at the school at the time now at i was stay on a football scholarship. anabel hurried out to th
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 8:00am EDT
cheesy science project dirty bomb or something with low you but you float into the seattle harbor or whatever on a container ship, or something like tel aviv harbor or whatever. so there's no like destroy the world scenario that's likely, in my opinion, with any of these terrorist regimes. and i think it's important for people who don't understand nuclear weapons to know that, to realize that. so the thing that occurred to me was you said, you were saying that if we had such a thing happen, like a hiroshima type weapon go off in one of the harbors or something like that, we wouldn't know at the time it's too late to know how to respond, where do you respond. so i guess my question would be, that's still the case now, how do we know where to respond? i guess other than iran and korea, how do we know even how to begin to respond now while we think these guys are developing their science project weapon? >> let me take the last part first. we have nuclear forensics for certain countries. we know the signatures of the weapons. russia, former soviet union, those weapons, we have signatu
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 11:00pm EDT
the human mind would shock you. >> host: thank you so much. the secret science of winning campaigns is provocative and playing the groundwork for things to come. thank you for doing this. are you doing this going forward? >> i am reporting for slate. especially right teeing about the nuts and bolts. it is a fun time i will be out on election day. >> we will hear about it when the election is over. >> guest: thank you for having me. >> let me start tonight to ask you come at you focus on nine women per know-how do so let them? >> -- how did you select them? we could have done more but with the confine of the book you could only do so much. democrats, republicans, diff erent ages. we knew on the basis of nine you could not make generalizations that were 100% certain. conclusions were hypotheses that other people run with. in order to make that hypothesis we needed a diverse group. >> we also included women that was the white house project so several with men that the white house project identified olympia snowe, kathleen sebelius sebelius, they want to consider the notion with her founda
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 10:00pm EDT
funded research to push boundaries of science, research, chemistry, biology so smart risk takers turn them into new companies. that was the public side. the private side is the natural entrepreneurship. country. put that together. you get a great america, an an america that delivers on the american dream. we declined on the public side. we need to get back to reinvesting in that. >> host: mark in pennsylvania. plead, go ahead with the question for the two authors. >> caller: yes, i was wondering if -- hello? >> host: we're listening, mark. >> caller: yes, i was wondering if you think it's too late because if you looked at the amount we export and the amount we import from around the world that it might be too late to turn america around? >> host: michael? >> guest: it's not too late. we have exactly enough time to turn it around if we start now. we have the human capital, the resources, and the traditions, but we have to get serious about the challenges, and incidentally, we are bullish on american factories, and there's changes like 3-d printing technology that favors us. we'll have,
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 7:00am EDT
sort of a gun is as much political science as anything else. i think a big, a big factor is am i know, i don't want to sound too earthly about this, but the rise of computer redistricting strangely enough, that the members of congress, state legislatures have created congressional seats in the house of representatives that are all democratic or all republican. that are relatively few swing states. we've seen a bunch of change in the past couple of election, but that's very much been the exception rather than the rule. so minutes of the house of representatives fear primaries more than they fear generate elections by and large. and does they gravitate towards the margins of their parties. that doesn't fully explain the senate, because you can't redistrict the senate, but it is had and he knows impact at the state, state legislature level and the more polarized politics. we have also i think the news media plays a role in this. it used to be that there was a kind of shared set of assumptions and news, everybody watched walter cronkite or huntley and brinkley and they sort of made an eff
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 7:45pm EDT
really great question. that is sort of as much political science at something else. a big political factor, i don't want to sound too nerdy about this, but the rise of computer aids for districts are, the members of congress, state legislatures have created congressional seats in the house of representatives that are all democratic, all republican. there are relatively few seats. we have seen a bunch of change in the past couple of elections, but that is very much the exception rather than the rule. some members of the house of representatives fear, figure primaries more than they fear general elections, by and large. thus, they gravitate towards the margins of their parties. that does not fully explain the senate. because you can't redistricted senate, but it has had an enormous impact on the state and that the state legislature level. in the more polarized politics that we have. i also think that the news media plays a role in this. it used to be that there was a kind of shared set of assumptions and news. and everybody watches walter cronkite and they sort of made an effort to, y
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 5:00pm EDT
science, politicized religion is the sheet anchor of the tree or a 40-year-old culture wars and that's the end of that passage. i hope the listener does not construe this as a condemnation of religion. it is rather a condemnation of the merger of politics and religion that we've been seeing occurring over the last 30 years, a phenomenon that debases both politics and religion. as i conclude the tab turner, the united states has been fortunate to have a weighted sum of the worst aspect of europe's history. it had something to do with it, but so did the system of governments that permitted and encouraged religious pluralism, what america did not tubeless mandate a religious test for the office or basis for our domestic detentions as freedom of the bible. the party is attempting to do michelle long recredit. not so much for the republican party. what about the democrats? as i described them in the introduction, the democratic party hosted far too long on franklin d. roosevelt's legacy became complacent and began to feel entitled to its near hegemonic position in culture and the med
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 7:00pm EDT
secret science of winning campaigns. .. but, maybe i should start by orienting people to what the school book is. it's part of a series that oxford publishes called a very short introduction and they are short, they have about 300 titles, and they asked me to do a supreme court title. i guess about three years ago and the book cannot this spring. it came out on the eve of the health care decision. so, who knew three years ago that we would be faced with a supreme court dealing with the most closely watched and maybe one of the most contentious case in many many years, and i would be happy -- the book doesn't say anything about the health care case, so in the q&a, i would be happy to share some conversations about that with you. but i thought i would step back and give a little bit of my take on how the court has gotten to where it is, not so much current events, but really looking back to read the book starts with a little history. it's not a book of history. i may court watcher is what i think of myself as a core group be. what is interesting about the court when you kind of step
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 2:00pm EDT
europe, which is you notice in the american press, systematically underreported to science we now see a political reaction to the economic crisis of monumental proportions. tweedledum tweedledee, operations between two political parties, very much like republicans and democrats here. what was called the greek socialist party and they would alternate every few years and they would change the. this year, everything increased changed. after the crunched down on the greek people, making them pay for crisis that has nothing to do with those and then paid for bailing out the richest folks in greece, etc., the greek people did what no one thought they would. the majority of people did not vote for either of those two parties, trying to understand what it was like to vote for neither the republicans are the or the democrats. in the last two elections, democracy and socialist party together brought under 40% that can bind the vote. an explosive party is the party called the cerise a party. it is a far left-wing party that is against all oesterle programs and wants to solve greece's problems th
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 10:00am EDT
suggested confiscating all the furniture from the science wing. that'd show 'em. anna belle laughed her head-back laugh. learning happens in many different ways, i'm just saying. but even something this silly could get out of hand, and she knew it. the science teachers, especially, that was where scores most needed to come up. anna belle looked to the ceiling. after 15 years as an administrator, she knew ms. kaiser's kind. ms. kaiser was young, ms. kaiser had time and energy to spare and apparently tables too. [laughter] anna belle had been like ms. kaiser once, in another life, it seemed. can you tell carmen to lasso those teachers up? i told them, do not move furniture. then she hurried the talk along. ordinary drama made for a pleasant distraction, and after that there was still the matter of the squirrel eating through i.t. cables to address. after the meeting anna belle made her rounds. she came across a teacher agonizing over whether to shut down his fish tank. no be, anna belle told him, there's a living thing in there -- [laughter] so this next passage involves something that sh
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 10:15am EDT
mills, and tweets. a science writer and columnist for discover magazine will look at the cyberworld, popular culture, and computer networking and politics liven in eastern. >> his thoughts on the interpretation of the u.s. constitution and what the author teams are many obtuse passages. the constitution cannot be understood by its original text alone, but through historical precedent. discusses his book with supreme court justice clarence thomas at the national archives here in washington. this is about power and 20 minutes. >> could evening. it's a pleasure to welcome you to the national archive. a special welcome to our friends at c-span and the other media outlets to are with us tonight. special guest in the audience today that i want to single out for special welcome, senator mike lee who is a good friend of the national archives. the future supreme court justice , he was at the u.s. court of appeals for the third circuit. welcome. on monday the constitution of the u.s. states turned 225. tonight's program is one of several that the national archives is presenting this month in
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 5:00pm EDT
for a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." it's about thirty minutes. if we can have nerve the back come on. thank you for your patience. we have -- the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block here was horrendous. apparently thank you, people are nodding. that's good. thank you very much. so there may be some people held up still. we'll welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter, the executive directer. ly ask you as a court sei those who are recording the program and the speakers to be kind enough to turn off your cell phone, pda and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. that said we'll go ahead and come up and do the interview with tony. the people die. we want the six of them out. what we want is -- deliver the six by providing them with -- you can send them training wheels and get them to the board we are gatorade. it would take a miracle to get them out. what are we watching? i have an idea. there are canadian film crew for science fiction. we file together as a company. this is how we make a big movie. you want to come
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 8:45am EDT
to science. biological tests, subjected his body to biological tests and it pulled the point. the thing that is ironic about it. the judge, the man who was the judge in that trial did not accept clarence darrow's argument. he sentenced them to life imprisonment because he was convinced in his memoirs he was convinced it would be the more cruel thing, the more cruel punishment. so clarence darrow never knew that this judge did not accept his argument. he actually made a wonderful argument against the death penalty, but the judge did not accept it. anyway. >> it is a famous argument, and it is a classic darrow argument in that it does not start at a endo disease. it starts as a end then it backtracks and wonders of them bring up in and no and be. if you talk for three days you can't go from aided be. the total impression will be lost. he had to sort of read back like of be looking for a flower. and one of the things that he consistently did in the trial, illinois had never executed teenager's in a case where they pled guilty, and so he pled the two of them guilty and was constantly
CSPAN
Sep 30, 2012 9:00pm EDT
you're going to focus on them but we have a far better science now in understanding and a lot of is informed by the psychology research and so the science of the mobilization turnout has gotten much better it's still pretty vague and it's reinvesting in a lot of mobilization techniques because we have learned in the last decade how they work as we have two separate things you sort of know once you get somebody to implicate voting by the two per cent and now we have better targeting techniques to figure out who you talk to and about what what message or targeting but the big campaigns do targeting and analysis on the front end of the allows them to understand far more precise clean way for their turn of targets and they don't need to talk to until who the persuasion targets are and if you are narrowing your universe the people you're trying to persuade you can make your messages sharper. you can sort of focus or qualitative research and focus groups and polling and an experimental testing to get more closely to the question of what that, what is at 7%. so you are talking to 7% and th
CSPAN
Sep 29, 2012 10:00pm EDT
things, after they won the nomination built what they call the data science team and increasingly that sort of function is becoming a core function of the campaign. it used to be that there were lists for fundraising or voter list and you could buy them from vendors or consultants and now, you know, basically it's a core function of a modern campaign to have people especially on the voter side just crunching and processing data. >> host: if any of us were to go into the romney campaign are the obama campaign and we were to look around the headquarters how many people -- is there a lot of young staff? what does it look like? >> guest: chicago dozens of people doing voter data and date and fundraising data on line analytics and every state there are jobs that are data jobs, voter file managers targeting directors. the obama campaign while thousands of people around the country hundreds of them are directly interacting with data every day. >> host: do you think one of the parties, the republicans are the democrats, is more adept at using this technique or they'll sort of at the same level
CSPAN
Oct 1, 2012 12:00am EDT
focus on them. we we have a far better science now in understanding what mate voted people to vote and a lot of it informed by behavioral psychological research. the science persuasion still pretty vague, and so i do think that there's been a sort of reinvesting in a lot of mobilization techniques in part because we have learned in the last decade how they work. you have the two separate thing. you know when you get to somebody what you can do by increase their likelihood of voting by 2% with i have better techniques to figure out who you talk to about what. i don't think about it necessarily as message or targets. good campaigns do targeting and analysis on the front thanked allows them to understand in a far more precise clean way for who are the turnout targets who they don't need to talk to until it's time to push them to vote and the persuasion targets. if you're narrowing the people you can presuede you can make the message sharper. you focus the groups in polling and exoormt tal testing to get more closely to the question whether it's 7%, if you're talking 7% who are persuadable
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21